About

I am a Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science at Yale University and an East Asian Studies Prize Fellow at The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale. My research in comparative political economy and comparative politics focuses on how political institutions and post-industrial forces shape domestic political competition in advanced industrialized countries, with a special interest in the case of Japan. My research methods mix qualitative and quantitative strategies. In my dissertation, I combine methods such as direct observation, interviews, and survey experiments to examine patterns of democratic representation in contemporary Japan.

My work is supported by the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership, the Council on East Asian Studies at Yale University, and the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale.

Before graduate school, I worked on a fixed-income trading floor at a Japanese investment bank in New York City. I was on the interest rates sales desk, and our group covered global central banks and Japanese institutional investors. I received a Master of Arts degree in East Asian Studies from Yale and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Government and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies from Dartmouth College.